Sunday, October 21, 2018

Hethpool Linn Walk

This delightful walk follows a circular route from Hethpool to Hethpool Linn returning via the lower slopes of Wester Tor. Hethpool is situated at the northern end of the Cheviot Hills in the College Valley.  From Wooler follow the A697 towards Coldstream for about 2.5 miles.  At Akeld turn left onto the B6351 and follow this road until you reach Kirknewton. Carry on a short distance to Westnewton and turn left, signposted to Hethpool. Follow this single track road for about 1.75 miles. Park in the car park just past the cottages at Hethpool on the left. Beyond the car park is the College Valley Estate. A permit is required for vehicles to use this road. Access is permitted on foot or by bicycle.


Car Park

1. Leave the car park and turn right heading back along the road. Just past the cottages as the road bears to the left go through a gate on the right and follow the track, signposted St Cuthbert's Way downhill until you reach a stile on the left.





2. Cross the stile and head straight across the field to a gate in the wall ahead.  Go through the gate and continue straight ahead to cross the boardwalk.Bear right towards the fence and continue with the fence on your left before reaching a stile. Cross the stile and turn immediately right before crossing a footbridge. Continue straight on along the path with the wall on your right. As the wall ends you will be able to see the waterfall below. Continue straight ahead turning right at the bottom to cross the burn via a wooden bridge,



       


Hethpool Linn








3. After crossing the burn turn left to cross another stile. Turn right and head uphill away from the burn. At the top go through the gate in the fence and turn right to join St Cuthbert's Way. Continue along this path through some newly planted trees before eventually reaching another fence. As you walk along the lower slopes of Wester Tor on your left look out for the wild Cheviot Goats who graze there.








4. Pass through the gate and follow the track through an area of recently felled trees following the track downhill towards the burn. Cross the bridge and turn right through a gate and follow the track up the hill back to the road. Turn left and follow the road past the cottages at Hethpool and back to the car park.

College Burn

Saturday, October 20, 2018

Hethpool Linn


Hethpool Linn

Hethpool Linn is a beautiful waterfall situated in the Cheviot Hills within the Northumberland National Park. The waterfall forms of the College Burn near Hethpool in the College Valley,  running through a small gorge and tumbling over rocks before continuing its journey peacefully along the valley floor. It is situated within a small wooded area of the valley close to the hamlet of Hethpool and is crossed via a small wooden bridge. When approaching the waterfall take care of the steep sides. The waterfall can be walked to on its own or part of a longer walk (Hethpool Linn Walk).
















College Valley

College Valley

The College Valley is a beautiful, tranquil valley at the northern end of the Cheviot Hills within the Northumberland National Park. The stunning unspoilt views of woodland, moorland and pastureland are breathtaking and provide a magnificent backdrop to the valley below. 


College Valley

Near Hethpool

The College Burn cuts its way through the hills meandering along the valley floor. At Hethpool Linn the burn runs through a narrow gorge, tumbling over the rocks before continuing its peaceful journey.



College Burn 

Hethpool Linn
The slopes of the Newton Tors and Yeavering Bell are home to the Cheviot Wild Goats. The feral goats herds have lived on the hills for centuries and are thought to originate from the earliest Neolithic farmers. The goats live a totally wild existence on the hills but many will come close enough to be photographed. Roe deer, red squirrels and other wildlife also live in the valley. 

This unspoilt serene valley is the ideal place for leisurely walks along the banks of the College Burn and the spectacular Hethpool Linn or for hill climbs to the ancient hill forts. 

Below are some things to see and do whilst visiting the valley.

Hethpool Linn

Hethpool Linn Walk

 

Friday, September 14, 2018

Bamburgh Lighthouse Walk

This pleasant walk along the beach from Bamburgh Castle to the lighthouse, returning via the church is about 3 miles and will take about 1hr 30 minutes - 1hr 45 minutes. Bamburgh is on the coast just north of Seahouses and about 5 miles from the A1 on the B1432 

1. Drive through the village and park in the free car park opposite the castle. 


Car Park
Bamburgh Castle from the Car Park

2. Cross the road and walk up the small road opposite towards the castle entrance. At the top take the path heading down through the dunes towards the beach keeping the castle to your left. From the beach you will see Inner Farne Island and will have a stunning view of the Castle.


Inner Farne Island
Bamburgh Castle


3. Turn left and set off along the beach keeping the castle on your left. As you near stag rock and the lighthouse you will see Holy Island in the distance. Walk across the expanse of rocks and continue up a small grassy hillock to the lighthouse. This is a good place to stop and rest and admire the wonderful views back to the castle.

Rocks near the lighthouse

Stag Rock
Bamburgh Lighthouse
Holy Island in the Distance
Bamburgh Castle from the Lighthouse

4. Retrace your steps back along the beach for a while until you see a car park above the dunes on the right. Cut across the sand dunes and head up to the car park, Cross the car park and turn left onto a small road. Follow this road until you reach the village. Turn right and walk a short distance before reaching St Aidan's church on the right. This lovely church is well worth visiting and in the churchyard you will find the tomb of Grace Darling. Opposite the church is the Grace Darling Museum which is also worth a visit. 


Bamburgh Village
St Aidan's Church
Tomb of Grace Darling

5. Leave the church and turn left back to the village. Continue to follow the road as it passes the castle and back to the car park.









Thursday, September 13, 2018

Bamburgh

Bamburgh

Bamburgh is a small picturesque village on the Northumberland coast. It is a about 5 miles from the A1 on the B1432 and a few miles north of Seahouses becoming popular with visitors to the magnificent Bamburgh Castle. The village contains numerous gift shops and places to eat and is a lovely place to spend a relaxing afternoon. In the peaceful churchyard of St Aidan's church is the tomb of Grace Darling and directly opposite is the Grace Darling Museum.



Bamburgh Beach is a beautiful, wild sandy beach overlooked by the towering castle. the beach, backed by sand dunes has stunning views to Holy island and the Farne Islands. It is worth taking a walk to the stag rocks and the lighthouse.


Inner Farne Island

Holy Island





Bamburgh Castle
Bamburgh Castle is a magnificent ancient fortress overlooking A glorious sandy beach. Situated on the top of a rocky outcrop the castle has wonderful views to Holy Island and the Farne Islands.

Bamburgh Castle was built by the Normans in the late 11th century to replace a Celtic Brittonnic Fort known as Din Guarie, which was destroyed by the Vikings. By 1164 the keep had been built and the castle was complete. The Forster family were governors of the castle until 1700  when Lord Crew and his son son John took over. In 1894 the castle was purchased by William Armstrong, a Victorian Industrialist. The castle is still owned by the Armstrong family who remain in residence. 


Bamburgh Castle
Bamburgh Castle

St Aidan's Church
St Aidan's Church was built in the 12th century, replacing the original wooden church founded by St Aidan in 635. In the peaceful churchyard of this picturesque church is the tomb of Grace Darling.


St Aidan's Church
View from the Church
Tomb of Grace Darling

Tuesday, September 04, 2018

Jedburgh



Jedburgh is an attractive market town in the Scottish Borders. It is situated on the banks of the Jed water and is about 10 miles from the English Border. This historic town has had a turbulent past and has been raided and attacked by both Scottish and English forces many times. 


Jedburgh Abbey overlooking the Jed Water

The town is home to the ruinous Jedburgh Abbey and in 1566 Mary Queen of Scots stayed in a house in the town that has now become a museum. Jedburgh Castle was built in the 12th century and was fought over many times during the Wars of Scottish Independence. Unfortunately, although it was occasionally used as a Scottish royal residence the castle was demolished by the Scots in 1409. In 1823 a jail was built on the site of the old castle. This closed in 1868 but has been restored to its original appearance and is now open to the pubic as Jedburgh Castle Jail and Museum.

Jedburgh Abbey

Jedburgh Abbey

Jedburgh Abbey was founded by King David I in 1138. It was originally both a priory and monastery and was home to a group Augustinian Canons until the 16th century. The abbey had a torrid time during the Wars of Scottish Independence and suffered many raids and attacks. These continued throughout the following centuries as the abbey slowly fell into disrepair. By the time of the Reformation in 1560 the abbey was in a poor state and was allowed to fall into disrepair. The church was used as a parish church until 1871 although some repairs were carried to in the late 1800's the abbey and church were never used again.

The Nave